HomeTrendingWhen And Where Was Theodorus Born? What Is His Philosophy

When And Where Was Theodorus Born? What Is His Philosophy

Theodorus of Cyrene, sometimes known as “the Atheist” (Greek: ; c. 340–c. 250 BCE), was a Greek philosopher who belonged to the Cyrenaic school. He spent his life in Greece as well as Alexandria, but he passed away at the city of Cyrene, which was his birthplace.

As a Cyrenaic philosopher, he taught that the purpose of life was to achieve joy and avoid sadness, and that the former stemmed from knowledge, while the latter resulted from ignorance. He believed that knowledge was the path to happiness, while ignorance was the path to unhappiness.

However, his main claim to fame was supposedly the fact that he was an atheist. In most cases, ancient writers referred to him as ho atheos, which can be translated as “the atheist.”

When And Where Was Theodorus Born

Theodorus was a student of Aristippus the Younger, who was the grandson of Aristippus the Elder, who was a far more well-known figure. Alongside Aristippus, he attended the lectures of a number of other prominent philosophers, including Anniceris, Dionysius the dialectician, Zeno of Citium, and Pyrrho.

It is not known why he was exiled from Cyrene; nonetheless, we know this about him because of a statement he made at the time that was recorded: “Men of Cyrene, you do evil in sending me from Libya to Greece.” Additionally, we know this about him because he was a follower of Alexander the Great.

Aristippus, from which it can be deduced that he was originally from the city of Cyrene. There is no continuous account of his future biography; nonetheless, the legends about him show that he was in Athens, where he nearly escaped a trial, maybe for impiety. This narrow escape occurred in Athens.

The influence of Demetrius Phalereus, on the other hand, is said to have protected him; as a result, we can probably put this occurrence during Demetrius’ ten years of administration at Athens, which took place between 317 and 307 BCE.

It is not out of the question to assume that Theodorus was complicit in the overthrow of Demetrius and his subsequent exile, given that he was exiled from Athens and later worked for Ptolemy in Egypt after that.

[source: missing citation] Diogenes Laertius’s tale of Amphicrates of Athens, in which he is said to have been sentenced to drink hemlock and died as a result of his punishment, is very certainly false.

[source: missing citation] While working for Ptolemy, Theodorus was given the responsibility of delivering an embassy to Lysimachus, a man whom he had previously insulted with the candour of his statements.

One of the responses that he gave to a threat of crucifixion that Lysimachus had used was celebrated by many ancient writers (Cicero, Seneca, etc.):

When And Where Was Theodorus Born

“Employ such threats to those courtiers of yours; for it matters not to Theodorus whether he rots on the ground or in the air.” (It doesn’t matter to Theodorus whether he rots on the ground or in the air.)

It would appear that he went back to Ptolemy’s camp after spending time in Lysimachus’ court or camp. We have also read that Jesus travelled to Corinth with a number of his students; however, it is possible that this was merely a brief visit during the time that he was residing in Athens.

He eventually made his way back to Cyrene and resided there, according to Diogenes Laertius, with Magas, the stepson of Ptolemy, who ruled Cyrene for around fifty years, first as viceroy and later as king, between the years 300 and 250 BCE.

Cyrene was most likely where Theodorus lived out his final days. According to the many illustrative anecdotes of Theodorus that have been recorded (by authors such as Laertius, Plutarch, Valerius Maximus, and Philo, among others), he seems to have been a man of quick wit and acute observation.

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Philosophy Of Theodorus

Theodorus is credited with being the founder of a religious movement that would later be known as “Theodoreans” or “Theodoreioi.” As one might deduce from Diogenes Laertius’s somewhat befuddled statement,

Theodorus held beliefs that were in line with those of the Cyrenaic school. He preached that the primary purpose of a human life is to achieve joy and keep away from sorrow, and that the former is the natural consequence of having knowledge while the latter is the outcome of being ignorant.

He described the virtues of prudence and justice as the good, and he defined evil as the opposite of these virtues. However, neither pleasure nor agony had any effect on him. He laughed at the importance of friendship and patriotism, and he declared that the entire globe was his country.

He taught that if one ignored public opinion, which had been produced by the consent of fools, then there was nothing inherently shameful about stealing, adultery, or sacrilege. He said this because public opinion had been formed by fools.

Philosophy Of Theodorus

Theodorus came under fire for his lack of religious belief. “He did away with all opinions about the Gods,” claims Lartius, although other critics wonder whether he was an absolute atheist or simply denied the reality of the deities that are commonly believed to exist. Lartius says that he did away with all opinions respecting the Gods.

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The accusation of atheism is supported by the common designation of Atheus, as well as by the authority of Cicero, Lartius, Pseudo-Plutarch, Sextus Empiricus, and some Christian writers; yet, some people (for example, Clement of Alexandria) speak of him as just rejecting the popular theology.

On the Gods ( v) is the title of a book that was written by Theodorus. Laertius got the opportunity to view it and shared his opinion that it should not be disregarded.

He also mentioned that it was rumoured to have been the inspiration for a great deal of Epicurus’ assertions and arguments. According to the Suda, he penned a great number of works, some of which were on the beliefs of his sect while others were on other topics.

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  • Sujay Patil

    Myself Sujay Patil, I aim to cover the latest trends in the entertainment industry with my own unique perspective thrown in for a good measure. I love dogs and reading about topics ranging from sports to science and technology. I am final year Engineering student.

Sujay Patil
Sujay Patil
Myself Sujay Patil, I aim to cover the latest trends in the entertainment industry with my own unique perspective thrown in for a good measure. I love dogs and reading about topics ranging from sports to science and technology. I am final year Engineering student.
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